Sinaloa Cartel Kingpin “Chapo” Guzman Replaces Al Capone as Chicago’s Public Enemy No. 1

Michael Tarm
Associated Press (via CNS news)
February 14, 2013

 

DEA's Chicago Division Special Agent in Charge Jack Riley: "If I was to put those two guys in a ring, El Chapo would eat that guy [Al Capone] alive."

DEA’s Chicago Division Special Agent in Charge Jack Riley: “If I was to put those two guys in a ring, El Chapo would eat that guy [Al Capone] alive.”

CHICAGO (AP) — A drug kingpin in Mexico who has never set foot in Chicago has been named the city’s new Public Enemy No. 1 — the same notorious label assigned to Al Capone at the height of the Prohibition-era gang wars.

The Chicago Crime Commission considers Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman even more menacing than Capone because he’s the leader of the Sinaloa cartel, which supplies most of the narcotics sold in the city.

“What Al Capone was to beer and whiskey during Prohibition, Guzman is to narcotics,” said Art Bilek, the commission’s executive vice president. “Of the two, Guzman is by far the greater threat. … And he has more power and financial capability than Capone ever dreamed of.”

The commission — a non-government body that tracks city crime trends — designated Capone Public Enemy No. 1 in 1930. It has declared other outlaws public enemies, but Capone was the only one deemed No. 1.

Until now.

Guzman is thought to be holed up in a mountain hideaway in western Mexico, but he ought to be treated as a local Chicago crime boss for the havoc his cartel creates in the nation’s third-largest city, said Jack Riley, of the Drug Enforcement Administration, which joined the commission in affixing the title to Guzman.

The point of singling out Guzman was to inspire more public support for going after him, Bilek said.

“Ninety-nine percent of the people in the United States have never heard of this man,” he said. “Concerted action … must be taken now against Guzman before he establishes a bigger network and a bigger empire in the United States.”

Capone based his bootlegging and other criminal enterprises in Chicago during Prohibition, when it was illegal to make or sell alcohol in the U.S. He eventually went to prison for income tax evasion, but he gained the greatest notoriety for the 1929 St. Valentine’s Day Massacre that left seven rivals dead.

Yet Riley says Guzman — whose nickname means “shorty” in Spanish — is more ruthless than Capone, whose nickname was “Scarface.”

“If I was to put those two guys in a ring, El Chapo would eat that guy (Capone) alive,” Riley told The Associated Press in a recent interview at his office, pointing at pictures of the men.

Read the full article— Cartel kingpin is Chicago’s new Public Enemy No. 1

Traces of Reality: Need anyone with two brain cells to rub together be reminded that Capone achieved notoriety as a direct result of the black market profitability that alcohol prohibition created?  Such a raging success that travesty was….  -DB